Yustina Neni (Director of Yogyakarta Biennale Fondation), Alia Swastika (Curator/Indonesia), Suman Gopinath (Co-curator/India) (Photo By Oblo)

Governor of Yogyakarta Special Province Sri Sultan HB X and Cultural Attache of Indian Embassy Mr. Zahur Zaidi in The installation of Jompet Kuswidananto at the opening of Biennale Jogja XI 26 November 2011, at Jogja National Museum (Photo By Oblo)

Preview: 25 November 2011 | Opening: 26 November 2011

 

At:

Jogja National Museum, Jl. Gampingan no. 1, Yogyakarta

Taman Budaya, Jl. Sri Wedani no. 1, Yogyakarta

Biennale Jogja XI / Equator # 1, is the first in a series of five international biennales to take place in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The geographical point of reference for these Biennales is countries that are located near the equator ( 23.27º north and south of it) and the series will see Indonesia’s cultural engagement with the participating countries. Shadow Lines, the first edition, will have forty artists from Indonesia and India collaborating in the exhibition that opens on 26 November 2011.

Shadow Lines suggests imaginary lines that draw people together and pull them apart; it also refers to geo-political borders and the creation of modern states in South Asia. Curated by Alia Swastika (Indonesia) and Suman Gopinath (India), the Biennale, with its overarching theme of ‘religiosity, spirituality and belief’ will attempt to present ways in which artists from the two countries address and interpret their contemporary conditions, informed by their personal experiences, as also by the political structures of the countries they live in.

Participating artists include:

Atul Dodiya, Archana Hande, Anita Dube, Amar Kanwar, N S Harsha, Prabhavati Meppayil, Sreshta Rit Premnath, Pushpamala N, Riyaz Komu, K.P Reji, Sheela Gowda, Shilpa Gupta, Sheba Chhachhi, Sakshi Gupta, Valsan Koorma Kolleri, Setu Legi, Krisna Murti, Jompet Kuswidananto, Arahmaiani, Wedhar Riyadi, Andy Dewantoro, Christine Ay Tjoe, Paul Kadarisman, Albert Yonathan, Akiq AW, Ariadhitya Pramuhendra, Iswanto Hartono, Wimo Ambala Bayang, Tromarama, Octora, Theresia Agustina, Titarubi, RE Hartanto, Nurdian Ichsan, Wiyoga Muhardanto, Erika Ernawan, Melati Suryodarmo, Arya Panjalu / Sara Nuytemans, Ruangrupa, Irwan Ahmett

Besides the main exhibition in two venues, there will be several parallel programmes and special projects like the Equator Festival with the contemporary reinvention of the Ramayana ballet, seminars, artists’ talks and community projects. For further information visit our website: www.biennalejogja.org

 

 

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biennale Yogyakarta

The first in the Biennale Equator series is a focus on Indonesia and India
The news from Alia Swastika (curator) and Suman Gopinath (co-curator)

The links between Indonesia and India go back several millennia, to the sea lanes and the land routes that connected the two countries through trade and religion. At the turn of the 20th century, the poet Rabindranath Tagore, regarded as one of the pioneer bridge-builders between the two countries, was one of the first Indians to make a serious attempt at establishing a two-way traffic in scholarship and the arts between India and Indonesia. Tagore did not treat India as a ‘monolith’ in discussing the ways in which cultural influences radiated out of the subcontinent to reach the shores of Southeast Asia. Rather, he tried to forge links based on a study of the regionally differentiated literatures, cultural practices and histories of India. On arriving at the port of Jakarta in 1927, Tagore is said to have remarked , “I see India everywhere, but I do not recognize it.” [ Read more ]

biennale Yogyakarta

The Equator: Biennale Jogja XI 2011 will present approximately 40 Indonesian and Indian contemporary artists. Biennale Jogja’s Equator Series is intended not only to work with individual artists or groups, but also to work with arts organizations in Indonesia and in partner countries. Thus pioneering dialogue, cooperation, and partnerships will sustain and co-deliver new, more extensive cooperation.

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biennale Yogyakarta

The view of Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta (The Special Region of Yogyakarta, here after referred to as DIY) toward its main tourism assets, namely Mataram and classical Javanese culture, is obvious if we go to the website of DIY Tourism Board. Photo illustrations that are intended to characterize DIY include Sultanate buildings such as the Kraton and Tamansari Water Palace, or evidence of ancient civilizations such as the temple Candi Prambanan, Ratu Boko, and Borobudur. The illustrations are considered reasonable because, most visitors of Candi Prambanan are tourists staying in downtown Yogyakarta (here after referred to as Jogja). As a point of departure, Jogja is known as a city providing many options regarding tourism within and outside the administrative region.

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biennale Yogyakarta

Three terms, which were chosen for the 2009 Biennale Jogja X (BJ X) and whose meaning and implications are interesting to investigate, are the local idioms gugur gunung and gotong royong, along with the global, English idiom “jamming”. Those three terms, or idioms, were consistently highlighted and became the key words of BJ X 2009.

Gugur gunung and gotong royong have similar meanings. However, gugur gunung refers to a more active meaning, which is working together to achieve the goals that are coveted (collectively); while, gotong royong refers to the nature of togetherness as the result of working together (helping each other). Jamming – in the subtitle “Jogja Jamming” – was the theme of BJ X while the concepts of gugur gunung and gotong royong were two terms consistently mentioned in almost every speech, publication and interview during BJ X. The combination of these local and global phrases by Butet Kertaredjasa, the Director of BJ X 2009, in his speech on the opening night of the Biennale was used to describe the situation and the spirit of the event:

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biennale Yogyakarta

Engaging the Society

February 23, 2011

It seems that artists have always been engaged with the debate on the definition of their relationship with society from time to time. The nuances of the debate are varied, but they circle around the following issues: what is the meaning of society, or public, to the artists? Is the society perceived as a source of inspiration, or a subject providing a space for art practice? What would be the best way of approaching and responding to problems shared by the entire society?

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biennale Yogyakarta